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"Der weiße Hai" im Weltraum

"Entweder Ihre Produkte haben einen niedrigen Preis, oder Sie haben eine gute Story."
Eine packende Story, mit der es einem Unternehmen gelingt, sich besser und eindrucksvoller am Markt zu positionieren als der Wettbewerb, hilft dabei, hohe Preise und hohe Margen durchzusetzen und die ökonomische Ebene, auf der der Kunde direkte Preisvergleiche anstellt, zu überwinden. Und je abstrakter das Produkt ist, das verkauft wird (was z. B. bei vielen Bankprodukten aber auch Beratungsleistungen gilt), umso notwendiger ist es, die virtuelle Leere von nicht-materiellen Produkten mit einer überzeugenden Story zu füllen und aufzuladen.
Niemand weiß das besser, als der erfolgreiche Krimi-Bestseller-Autor Veit Etzold. Spannende und mitreißende Storys sind sein tägliches Geschäft. Was für Krimis oder Filme gilt, gilt auch für vermeintlich trockene Business-Themen.
In seinem Buch liefert er nicht nur konkrete Ideen für die Positionierung einer Firma (wie Branding und Change-Management), sondern dem Einzelnen auch Maßnahmenpläne zum "Verkaufen" seiner eigenen Geschichte. Denn beim individuellen Manager setzt jedes gute Storytelling an - über seine Person und seine Geschichten.
Damit kombiniert Etzold Ideen aus unterschiedlichen Bereichen, wie dem Self-Marketing, der Positionierung, dem Branding und dem Vertrieb.
Das Buch gibt Unternehmen und Managern die Tools an die Hand, die sie brauchen, um in einem überkommunizierten und übervollen Markt weiterhin als differenzierbare, hochpreisige Premiummarke zu bestehen und erfolgreich, nachhaltig und vor allem einzigartig gegenüber Kunden, Aktionären und der Gesellschaft zu kommunizieren.
Fallstudien sowie "Do it yourself"-Tests und Zusammenfassungen mit "Lessons Learned" am Ende eines jeden Kapitels sorgen dafür, dass sich das Gelernte durch Reflektion und Übung verfestigt und in der alltäglichen Unternehmenspraxis auch angewandt werden kann.

Aktualisierte Taschenbuchausgabe!
R 232,65

"Farewell, My Nation"

The fully updated third edition of “Farewell, My Nation” considers the complex and often tragic relationships between American Indians, white Americans, and the U.S. government during the nineteenth century, as the government tried to find ways to deal with social and political questions about how to treat America’s indigenous population.
  • Updated to include new scholarship that has appeared since the publication of the second edition as well as additional primary source material
  • Examines the cultural and material impact of Western expansion on the indigenous peoples of the United States, guiding the reader through the significant changes in Indian-U.S. policy over the course of the nineteenth century
  • Outlines the efficacy and outcomes of the three principal policies toward American Indians undertaken in varying degrees by the U.S. government – Separation, Concentration, and Americanization – and interrogates their repercussions
  • Provides detailed descriptions, chronology and analysis of the Plains Wars supported by supplementary maps and illustrations
R 1 386,50

"Farewell, My Nation"

The fully updated third edition of “Farewell, My Nation” considers the complex and often tragic relationships between American Indians, white Americans, and the U.S. government during the nineteenth century, as the government tried to find ways to deal with social and political questions about how to treat America’s indigenous population.
  • Updated to include new scholarship that has appeared since the publication of the second edition as well as additional primary source material
  • Examines the cultural and material impact of Western expansion on the indigenous peoples of the United States, guiding the reader through the significant changes in Indian-U.S. policy over the course of the nineteenth century
  • Outlines the efficacy and outcomes of the three principal policies toward American Indians undertaken in varying degrees by the U.S. government – Separation, Concentration, and Americanization – and interrogates their repercussions
  • Provides detailed descriptions, chronology and analysis of the Plains Wars supported by supplementary maps and illustrations
R 1 374,92

"Times Are Altered with Us"

"Times Are Altered with Us": American Indians from Contact to the New Republic offers a concise and engaging introduction to the turbulent 300-year-period of the history of Native Americans and their interactions with Europeans—and then Americans—from 1492 to 1800.
  • Considers the interactions of American Indians at many points of "First Contact" across North America, from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific and Atlantic Coasts
  • Explores the early years of contact, trade, reciprocity, and colonization, from initial engagement of different Indian and European peoples—Spanish, French, Dutch, English, and Russian—up to the start of tenuous and stormy relations with the new American government
  • Charts the rapid decline in American Indian populations due to factors including epidemic Old World diseases, genocide and warfare by explorers and colonists, tribal warfare, and the detrimental effects of resource ruination and displacement from traditional lands
  • Features a completely up-to-date synthesis of the literature of the field
  • Incorporates useful student features, including maps, illustrations, and a comprehensive and evaluative Bibliographical Essay
  • Written in an engaging style by an expert in Native American history and designed for use in both the U.S. history survey as well as dedicated courses in Native American studies
R 1 331,28

"Shouldn't You Be in School?"

Before the Baudelaires became orphans, before he encountered A Series of Unfortunate Events, even before the invention of Netflix, Lemony Snicket was a boy discovering the mysteries of the world.

Is Lemony Snicket a detective or a smoke detector?
Do you smell smoke? Young apprentice Lemony Snicket is investigating a case of arson but soon finds himself enveloped in the ever-increasing mystery that haunts the town of Stain'd-by-the-Sea. Who is setting the fires? What secrets are hidden in the Department of Education? Why are so many schoolchildren in danger? Is it all the work of the notorious villain Hangfire? How could you even ask that? What kind of education have you had?
Maybe you should be in school?
R 117,38

"Radical Academia"? Understanding the Climates for Campus Activists

Take an in-depth look at campus activism in the 21st century with this issue of New Directions for Higher Education.

Campuses have always experienced an ebb and flow of activism, and the recent displays of student activism on American campuses show that protesters remain a vibrant subculture in American higher education. From rising tuition costs to the need to improve and welcome diversity, activists signal a continued restlessness among the nation’s collegiate youth over various issues, expressing their views with a vigor comparable to most periods in American history.

The purpose of this work is to dispel the myths that today's activists are either apathetic or “radicals” determined on disrupting the “establishment.” It's also a guide to help higher education practitioners better understand the needs, rights, and responsibilities of campus activists. And, it will help readers understand the best paths to not only allowing student voice, but helping direct that voice toward peaceful and constructive expression.

This is the 167th volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Higher Education. Addressed to presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other higher education decision makers on all kinds of campuses, it provides timely information and authoritative advice about major issues and administrative problems confronting every institution.
R 421,93

"Radical Academia"? Understanding the Climates for Campus Activists

Take an in-depth look at campus activism in the 21st century with this issue of New Directions for Higher Education.

Campuses have always experienced an ebb and flow of activism, and the recent displays of student activism on American campuses show that protesters remain a vibrant subculture in American higher education. From rising tuition costs to the need to improve and welcome diversity, activists signal a continued restlessness among the nation’s collegiate youth over various issues, expressing their views with a vigor comparable to most periods in American history.

The purpose of this work is to dispel the myths that today's activists are either apathetic or “radicals” determined on disrupting the “establishment.” It's also a guide to help higher education practitioners better understand the needs, rights, and responsibilities of campus activists. And, it will help readers understand the best paths to not only allowing student voice, but helping direct that voice toward peaceful and constructive expression.

This is the 167th volume of the Jossey-Bass quarterly report series New Directions for Higher Education. Addressed to presidents, vice presidents, deans, and other higher education decision makers on all kinds of campuses, it provides timely information and authoritative advice about major issues and administrative problems confronting every institution.
R 421,93

"We Are Still Here"

In addition to revisions and updates, the second edition of “We Are Still Here” features new material, seeing this well-loved American History Series volume maintain its treatment of American Indians in the 20th century while extending its coverage into the opening decades of the 21st century.

  • Provides student and general readers concise and engaging coverage of contemporary history of American Indians contributed by top scholars and instructors in the field
  • Represents an ideal supplement to any U.S. or Native American survey text
  • Includes a completely up-to-date synthesis of the most current literature in the field
  • Features a comprehensive Bibliographical Essay that serves to aid student research and writing
  • Covers American Indian history from 1890 through 2013
R 421,93

"We Are Still Here"

In addition to revisions and updates, the second edition of “We Are Still Here” features new material, seeing this well-loved American History Series volume maintain its treatment of American Indians in the 20th century while extending its coverage into the opening decades of the 21st century.

  • Provides student and general readers concise and engaging coverage of contemporary history of American Indians contributed by top scholars and instructors in the field
  • Represents an ideal supplement to any U.S. or Native American survey text
  • Includes a completely up-to-date synthesis of the most current literature in the field
  • Features a comprehensive Bibliographical Essay that serves to aid student research and writing
  • Covers American Indian history from 1890 through 2013
R 421,93

"A Problem From Hell"

In 1993, as a 23-year-old correspondent covering the wars in the Balkans, I was initially comforted by the roar of NATO planes flying overhead. President Clinton and other western leaders had sent the planes to monitor the Bosnian war, which had killed almost 200,000 civilians. But it soon became clear that NATO was unwilling to target those engaged in brutal "ethnic cleansing." American statesmen described Bosnia as "a problem from hell," and for three and a half years refused to invest the diplomatic and military capital needed to stop the murder of innocents. In Rwanda, around the same time, some 800,000 Tutsi and opposition Hutu were exterminated in the swiftest killing spree of the twentieth century. Again, the United States failed to intervene. This time U.S. policy-makers avoided labeling events "genocide" and spearheaded the withdrawal of UN peacekeepers stationed in Rwanda who might have stopped the massacres underway. Whatever America's commitment to Holocaust remembrance (embodied in the presence of the Holocaust Museum on the Mall in Washington, D.C.), the United States has never intervened to stop genocide. This book is an effort to understand why. While the history of America's response to genocide is not an uplifting one, "A Problem from Hell" tells the stories of countless Americans who took seriously the slogan of "never again" and tried to secure American intervention. Only by understanding the reasons for their small successes and colossal failures can we understand what we as a country, and we as citizens, could have done to stop the most savage crimes of the last century.
R 280,64

"MR. PRESIDENT"


Although the framers gave the president little authority, George Washington knew whatever he did would set precedents for generations of future leaders. To ensure their ability to defend the nation, he simply ignored the Constitution when he thought it necessary.

In a revealing new look at the birth of American government, “Mr. President” describes Washington's presidency in a time of continual crisis, as rebellion and attacks by foreign enemies threatened to destroy this new nation. Constantly weighing preservation of the Union against preservation of individual liberties and states' rights, Washington assumed more power with each crisis. In a series of brilliant but unconstitutional maneuvers he forced Congress to cede control of the four pillars of executive power: war, finance, foreign affairs, and law enforcement.

Drawing on rare documents and letters, Unger shows how Washington combined political cunning and sheer genius to seize ever-widening powers, impose law and order while ensuring individual freedom, and shape the office of President of the United States.
R 124,56

"She Must Have Known"

Captivated by the hit ITV true crime drama DES? Uncover the truth behind the trial of Rosemary West, another of Britain's most infamous serial killers.
'Anyone reading this brilliant book will wonder whether justice was really done.' Evening Standard

In 1994, Frederick West was arrested and accused of murdering twelve young women. But it was the trial of his wife, Rosemary West, that became Britain's serial-killer trial of the century...

Detained for the murder of the twelve women found at 25 Cromwell Street, Gloucester, Frederick West hung himself on New Year's Day 1995. The case had enraged the nation, and the subsequent trial of Rosemary for the same crimes caused a media sensation.

How are ordinary human beings driven to become serial killers? How did this psychopath ensnare so many women? And how much was Rosemary truly involved?

Brian Masters attended the Rosemary West trial on a daily basis. In "She Must Have Known" he produces a penetrating study of the sexual obsession that led to a series of horrifying and measured killings, ultimately leaving the reader to make up their own mind on the guilt of Rosemary West.
_______________________

'By far the most interesting book on the subject... profound and illuminating.' Sunday Telegraph
'Another serious, compelling account of a serial killer.' The Sunday Times
'A classic of criminological literature.' Spectator

What readers are saying:

***** 'Brave and compelling and beautifully written. And it will certainly make you pause to think.'
***** 'I am grateful for the existence of writers like Brian Masters . . . This is an excellent book.'
***** 'Gives you the opportunity to consider the evidence against Rose West as a juror would rather than as a tabloid reader.'

R 99,08